Municipal Aggregation Is Killing Green Energy

 

  • Aggregation energy suppliers may not be held to the State Renewable Portfolio Standard for minimum green content.
  • The energy provided by aggregation suppliers typically minimal green content – even zero.
  • Aggregation energy might be best described as ‘Bargain Basement Brown Energy’.                                                    

 

See articles below for more information…

 

Coal Ash: 130 Million Tons of Waste

60 Minutes Investigates a Potentially Harmful Waste Byproduct that Inundated a Tenn. Town

We burn so much coal in this country for electricity that every year that process generates 130 million tons of waste. Most of it is coal ash, and it contains some nasty stuff. Environmental scientists tell us that the concentrations of mercury, arsenic, lead and other toxic metals are considerably higher in coal ash than in ordinary soil.

When coal ash is disposed of in dry, lined impoundments it is said to be safe. But it’s often dumped into wet ponds – there are nearly 500 of them across the country – and in those cases the ash could pose health risks to the nearby communities.

Jim Roewer, one of the top lobbyists for the power industry, told 60 Minutes correspondent Lesley Stahl that nearly half of the electricity in the United States is generated by coal.

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A Spill That Won’t Clean – TIME

 

 

Experts: Chicago aggregation could hurt renewable energy — unless the RPS is fixed

chicago-power-lines-425x304In November, Chicago residents will vote on whether to allow the city to break with utility ComEd and negotiate to buy electricity from alternative retail electric suppliers (or ARES) for residential and small business customers.

The move could save ratepayers money, and many see it as a statement of environmental consciousness and independence – a chance to intentionally buy from smaller suppliers that promise they are providing renewable energy.

But due to a quirk in the state’s Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS), aggregation in Illinois has little chance of driving new construction of wind or solar power. Unless the RPS is fixed, clean energy advocates and energy policy analysts say, aggregation — especially by a major city like Chicago — could be a serious blow for in-state renewable energy development.

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Air pollution causes cancer, world health authority says

STORY HIGHLIGHTS

  • NEW: “We know that it is causing cancer in humans,” scientist says
  • Air pollution is now officially a carcinogenic, the World Health Organization says
  • It is the world’s most widespread environmental cancer causing agent
  • Others diseases aggravated by pollution are heart disease and respiratory ailments

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(CNN) — The air many of us breathe poses serious health risks, the World Health Organization says. On Thursday, it added cancer to the list.

Air pollution is a now officially a carcinogen, and there are no caveats about the new classification.

“We know that it is causing cancer in humans,” said spokesman Kurt Straif.

In 2010, lung cancer resulting from air pollution took the lives of 223,000 people worldwide. As pollution levels climb, so will the rate of cancer, the WHO said.

And there is only one way to stop it: Clean up the air.

“We can’t treat ourselves out of this cancer problem,” said Chris Wild, who heads the WHO’s cancer research wing, the International Agency for Research on Cancer.

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Solar Power Begins to Shine as Environmental Benefits Pay Off

PARIS — Amid polemics over rising electricity prices in Europe and the level of green energy subsidies in various countries, it is easy to lose sight of the fact that the growth in clean-energy generation is a huge success story.

11iht-rbog-solar11-articleInlineSolar photovoltaic generation, known as PV, like wind power before it, is coming into the mainstream — at great environmental benefit.

Based on comparative life-cycle analyses of power sources, “PV electricity contributes 96 percent to 98 percent less greenhouse gases than electricity generated from 100 percent coal and 92 percent to 96 percent less greenhouse gases than the European electricity mix,” said Carol Olson, a researcher at the Energy Research Center of the Netherlands.

Photovoltaic generation offers several additional environmental advantages, Ms. Olson said in an interview.

“Compared with electricity from coal, PV electricity over its lifetime uses 86 to 89 percent less water, occupies or transforms over 80 percent less land, presents approximately 95 percent lower toxicity to humans, contributes 92 to 97 percent less to acid rain, and 97 to 98 percent less to marine eutrophication,” she said. Eutrophication is the discharge of excess nutrients that causes algal blooms.

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Autism, Air Pollution Link Confirmed By First National Study

A new national study shows a potential link between autism and air pollution.200261442-001

Living in an area with high levels of air pollution may increase a woman’s chances of having a child with autism, according to the first national study to date that investigates the possible link.

“Women who were exposed to the highest levels of diesel or mercury in the air were twice as likely to have a child with autism than women who lived in the cleanest parts of the sample,” study author Andrea Roberts, a research associate with the Harvard School of Public Health, told The Huffington Post.

Earlier studies have established a potential connection between air pollution and autism risk, but have concentrated on a few individual states. The latest study, published in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives on Tuesday, draws on a large sample of women across the whole country.

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Wind farms can provide a surplus of reliable clean energy to society, Stanford study finds

Researchers in the U.K. found wind turbines put out nearly twice the power in the long term than some critics have claimed.

wind turbinesWind turbines churn out as much as 75 percent of their original capacity in the long term, researchers in the United Kingdom have found.

Wind turbines are getting some serious airtime.

A new study from the United Kingdom has found wind turbines generate more power in the long term than some critics have claimed.

Some have argued turbines lose a third of their electrical output after just 10 years of operation, the paper said. Researchers from the Imperial College Business School, however, determined that turbines still churn out about three-quarters of their original capacity for 19 years – nearly twice as long.

“There have been concerns about the costs of maintaining aging wind farms and whether they are worth investing in,” professor Richard Green, a co-author of the study, said in a statement. “This study gives a ‘thumbs up’ to the technology and shows that renewable energy is an asset for the long term.”

 

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Study Gives Wind Turbines a ‘Thumbs Up’

Researchers in the U.K. found wind turbines put out nearly twice the power in the long term than some critics have claimed.

wind turbinesWind turbines churn out as much as 75 percent of their original capacity in the long term, researchers in the United Kingdom have found.

Wind turbines are getting some serious airtime.

A new study from the United Kingdom has found wind turbines generate more power in the long term than some critics have claimed.

Some have argued turbines lose a third of their electrical output after just 10 years of operation, the paper said. Researchers from the Imperial College Business School, however, determined that turbines still churn out about three-quarters of their original capacity for 19 years – nearly twice as long.

“There have been concerns about the costs of maintaining aging wind farms and whether they are worth investing in,” professor Richard Green, a co-author of the study, said in a statement. “This study gives a ‘thumbs up’ to the technology and shows that renewable energy is an asset for the long term.”

 

>> READ MORE

Germany Has Built Clean Energy Economy U.S. Rejected in 80siZhIpXzQ60Kc

InsideClimateNews (Berlin) — The view from the Reichstag roof on a sun-drenched spring afternoon is spectacular. Looking out over Berlin from the seat of the German government, you can see the full sweep of the nation’s history: from Humboldt University, where Albert Einstein taught physics for two decades, to the site of the former Gestapo headquarters.

I’m not here to see this country’s freighted past, however. I’ve come to learn about what a majority of Germans believe is their future—and perhaps our own. There is no better place to begin this adventure than the Reichstag, rebuilt from near ruins in 1999 and now both a symbol and an example of the revolutionary movement known as the Energiewende. The word translates simply as, “energy change.” But there’s nothing simple about the Energiewende. It calls for an end to the use of fossil fuels and nuclear power and embraces clean, renewable energy

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